Griffin Gallery Antiquities

PRICE REDUCTIONS FOR A LIMITED TIME
On Artifacts and Fine Art

UP TO 20% Off
On Most Items Over $1,000*

*Shipping Not Included

The Warren Court - 1968 Supreme Court Justices Signatures, Autographs


browse these categories for related items...
Directory: Traditional Collectibles: Ephemera: Autographs: Political: Pre 1970: Item # 1354150

Please refer to our stock # 3210 when inquiring.
Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
View Seller Profile
1020 Holland Drive, Suite 123
Boca Raton, FL 33487
tel 561-994-0811

Guest Book
 SOLD 
SOLD

The Warren Court - 1968 Supreme Court Justices, Signatures of Justices John Marshall Harlan II, Hugo Black, Earl Warren, Abe Fortas, Potter Stewart, William O. Douglas, Byron White, William J. Brennan Jr., and the first African American Justice Thurgood Marshall. First Day Issue U.S. Postal Stamp of Oliver Wendell Holmes, dated March 08, 1968. Prominent Americans Series. The Warren Court refers to the Supreme Court of the United States during the period when Earl Warren served as Chief Justice. Warren replaced the deceased Fred M. Vinson as Chief Justice in 1953, and Warren remained in office until he retired in 1969. Warren was succeeded as Chief Justice by Warren Burger. Warren led a liberal majority that used judicial power in dramatic fashion, to the consternation of conservative opponents. The Warren Court expanded civil rights, civil liberties, judicial power, and the federal power in dramatic ways. The court was both applauded and criticized for bringing an end to racial segregation in the United States, incorporating the Bill of Rights (i.e. including it in the 14th Amendment Due Process clause), and ending officially sanctioned voluntary prayer in public schools. The period is recognized as a high point in judicial power that has receded ever since, but with a substantial continuing impact. The Warren Court also sought to expand the scope of application of the First Amendment. The Court's decision outlawing mandatory school prayer in Engel v. Vitale (1962) brought vehement complaints by conservatives that echoed into the 21st century. Warren worked to nationalize the Bill of Rights by applying it to the states. Moreover, in one of the landmark cases decided by the Court, Griswold v. Connecticut (1965), the Warren Court affirmed a constitutionally protected right of privacy, emanating from the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, also known as substantive due process. This decision was fundamental, after Warren's retirement, for the outcome of Roe v. Wade and consequent legalization of abortion. With the exception of the desegregation decisions, few decisions were unanimous. The eminent scholar Justice John Marshall Harlan II took Frankfurter's place as the Court's self-constraint spokesman, often joined by Potter Stewart and Byron R. White. But with the appointment of Thurgood Marshall, the first black justice (as well as the first non-white justice), and Abe Fortas (replacing Goldberg), Warren could count on six votes in most cases.